Persia. Babylonia. Alexandrine Empire. Uncertain satraps of Babylonia, c. 328-311 BC

Persia. Babylonia. Alexandrine Empire. Uncertain satraps of Babylonia, c. 328-311 BC

800.00

AR Double Shekel, 16.22g (22mm, 3h). Baal seated left, holding scepter in right hand and placing left hand on throne, faint outline of Egyptian headdress to left / Lion walking left; above, Δ.

Pedigree: From a Swiss Numismatic Collection and purchased prior to 2005.

References:  BMC 17; Nicolet-Pierre 6

Grade:  Some lovely iridescent toning. Wear from die shift on obverse at head and lion’s head on reverse is at edge. VF  (gk1166)

Scroll down for more information about this coin.

Add To Cart
 

At the time when this coin was struck, Babylon was under the rule of Alexander the Great. The Battle of Gaugamela in which Alexander’s army fought the Persians took place in 331 BC close to the city of Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan. After the monumental battle was over, the Persians killed their leader Darius III and the Achaemenid Empire is generally seen to be over at this point. Alexander was apparently disappointed in the Persian reaction to killing Darius and held a state funeral for him in Persepolis. He even hunted down his killer Bessus and assassinated him a year later. As under the Achaemenids, Babylon was overseen by satraps (governors). Alexander respected this arrangement and even allowed coinage that harkened back to the Persian past. It is suggested that the god seated on the obverse bears striking similarities to Alexander’s own coinage with Zeus on the reverse. It is important to note that Alexander also struck imperial coinage simultaneously.