Maximian, 286-305 AD. Ticinum, c. 295 AD

Maximian, 286-305 AD. Ticinum, c. 295 AD

2,850.00

AR Argenteus, 2.90g (18mm, 5h). MAXIMIA-NVS AVG, laureate head of Maximianus right / VICTORIA SARMAT, the four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before city enclosure with six turrets.

References: RIC VI 16b. Jelocnik 37. RSC 548d.

Grade: Pristine condition with deep rainbow toning. Mint State (re1068)

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Maximian was the military might to Diocletian’s political brain. Diocletian had just instituted the first tetrarchy where power is divided between four individuals. In this case it was two in the eastern and two in the western parts of the Roman Empire. Maximian was Augustus of the west from from 286-305 AD, while Diocletian oversaw the eastern front. Much of Maximian’s early reign was spent fighting battles. Once campaigns concluded in 298 AD he retired to Italy. He was pushed by Diocletian to give up his position in 305 AD and gave his office to Constantius, another individual from the tetrarchy.

A short time later Maximian chose to re-enter the political game when in 306 AD he took the title of Augustus again under his son Maxentius. After trying to depose his son in 307 AD he took flight and sought refuge in the court of Constantine (who was incidentally also his son-in-law). At the council of Carnuntum, Diocletian and his successor Galerius forced Maximian to renounce his imperial claim. Ever tenacious, Maximian once again attempted to place himself as Augustus when Constantine was out on campaign on the Rhine in 310 AD. This last spectacle was too much for Constantine and he was forced to kill himself on the emperor’s orders.