Anglo-Saxon, Edward the Confessor. 1042-1066 AD. Hastings mint, c. 1053-1056 AD

Anglo-Saxon, Edward the Confessor. 1042-1066 AD. Hastings mint, c. 1053-1056 AD

2,100.00

AR Penny, 1.30g (20mm, 9h). Moneyer Dunning. Bust right wearing a pointed helmet, holding scepter; +EDPER-DREX / Voided short cross, limb ends with three crescents; +DVININC HAESTIE

Pedigree: From the Douglas Bayern Collection

References: Spink 1179. North 825. BMC Anglo-Saxon 506. Naismith, MEC 8, 2191

Grade: Choice Extremely Fine. Light golden toning over fresh surfaces  (wc1034)

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Edward the Confessor became King of England in 1042. His younger half-brother Cnut had died following a seizure during a wedding of two of his courtiers children. Edward’s reign lasted until his death in 1066 and he is considered the last legitimate Anglo-Saxon king prior to the Norman Conquest of 1066. Edward was even canonised in 1161, almost 100 years after his death. Edward was the eldest son of King Aethelred by his second wife, Emma of Normandy. When Aethelred died and Emma became the wife of Cnut, Edward and his family went into exile to Normandy for 24 years.

When Edward returned to England following Cnut’s death, he was virtually unknown and was inexperienced. He is viewed as a good king but his reign is overshadowed by the Norman Conquest. Without an heir at his death, Edward’s throne went to Harold Godwinson, a cousin of his wife Edith. He was killed the same year and another man, Edgar Aetheling was given the throne but was never crowned.